Gumprechts Green Pit Viper among 1,000 New Species Discovered in Mekong Region along with Previously Thought Extinct Species

December 26, 2008 / No Comments

Here today, gone tomorrow and back again today. That’s the story with the Gumprechts green pitviper and a Theloderma licin.

Scientists have found more than 1,000 new species in Southeast Asia’s Mekong region over the past 10 years. A spider as big as a dinner plate, a rat thought to have gone extinct 11 million years ago and a cyanide-laced, shocking pink millipede were also found.

gumprechts pit viper Gumprechts Green Pit Viper among 1,000 New Species Discovered in Mekong Region along with Previously Thought Extinct Species

A Gumprechts green pitviper and a Theloderma licin

The species were found in the rainforests and wetlands along the Mekong River, which flows through Cambodia, Laos, Myanmar, Thailand, Vietnam and the southern China. The official number is 1,068 and just some quickies: the huntsman spider has a leg span of 30cm; the dragon millipede produces cyanide (I wonder who found this out and how?).

Scientists also found species in rafters at restaurants.

Lots of biodiversity in the region said the head of the World Wildlife Fund. The species included:

  1. 519 plants,
  2. 279 fish,
  3. 88 frogs,
  4. 88 spiders,
  5. 46 lizards,
  6. 22 snakes,
  7. 15 mammals,
  8. 4 birds,
  9. 4 turtles,
  10. two salamanders and a toad

and a partridge in a pear tree.

Discoveries took place on average of two a week for 10 years. And, all was right with Charles Darwin lovers.

Source: Cri