Scientists Prove That Men Have Evolved From Apes (or the other way around?)

April 8, 2009 / 1 Comment

Some serious proof has been uncovered by the Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Germany.

The group has learned that wild female chimpanzees copulate more frequently with males who share meat with them over long periods of time. In other words, men that share, get it more often. (Can you imagine the guy sitting out in the wild counting how many times Rosy the Ape copulated this month?)

chimp Scientists Prove That Men Have Evolved From Apes (or the other way around?)

Zakayo, the oldest alpha male chimpanzee in Uganda

Scientists (ahem) have long puzzled about this. They believe that men who are more successful hunters get more wives and a larger number of offspring. Let’s see. Men who do their jobs well get better wives. And people study this over while sitting in bushes? Come on!

Studies on wild chimpanzees show that male hunters share meat (not that meat) with females who did not participate in the hunt. One hypotheses proposed is meat-for-sex. But evidence doesn’t really support the claim though males, both humans and chimpanzees want the support.

In research conducted in the Tai National Park, Coted’Ivoire, it was found that females copulate more frequently with males who share meat with them on at least one occasion. Males who never shared never had sex. Well, duh!!

Gomes said: “Our results strongly suggest that wild chimpanzees exchange meat for sex, and do so on a long-term basis. Males who shared meat with females doubled their mating success, whereas females, who had difficulty obtaining meat on their own, increased their caloric intake, without suffering the energetic costs and potential risk of injury related to hunting.”

“Previous studies might not have found a relationship between mating success and meat sharing because they focused on short-term exchanges; or perhaps because in those groups access to females was driven by male coercion so females rarely chose their mating partners,” she added.

The conclusion: “Our findings add to the ever-growing evidence suggesting that chimpanzees can think in the past and the future and that this influences their present behavior.”

So, “where’s my meat?”