Passive Solar Design: Porcupine Office Building Takes shape in the UK

April 14, 2009 / No Comments

Biomimicry is the art of imitating life and designing structures with inspiration from nature’s best blueprints. While most energy-saving and water conserving buildings take their motivations from plants, UK-based Moxon Architects have turned towards the porcupine for their stroke of brilliance. Or so it seems with the design for Oliver’s Place Preston.

porcupine office building 1 Passive Solar Design: Porcupine Office Building Takes shape in the UK

The 40,000 square foot office building sports an array of aluminum “reeds” that are all arranged in the same direction to incorporate passive solar heating into the structure and regulate its temperature— thus saving energy.

porcupine office building 2 Passive Solar Design: Porcupine Office Building Takes shape in the UK

The prickly looking extensions are arranged in such a fashion that they allow early morning winter sun to go through to the interior of the building unabated, while hot summer sun at noon would be blocked off. Apart from making a grand and distinct visual statement, it also keeps the rain away as it continues to save energy in the form of the building’s heating and cooling needs. [via Eikongraphia]