Proposal to turn Amsterdam’s abandoned sewage treatment silos into climbing gym, turned down

May 14, 2009 / No Comments

Here is a mighty good example of how apparently “useless” objects— however big they are, could be put to good use.

Since the officials of the city of Amsterdam, the Netherlands, were not prepared to let go waste three abandoned sewage treatment silos, they invited proposals, on a competitive basis, in order to settle on the best use that these structures can be put to use.

amsterdam silos turned into a gym 1 Proposal to turn Amsterdam’s abandoned sewage treatment silos into climbing gym, turned down

amsterdam silos turned into a gym 10 Proposal to turn Amsterdam’s abandoned sewage treatment silos into climbing gym, turned down

An interesting and practical proposal came from NL Architects, based in Amsterdam, suggesting that the huge silos be turned into climbing towers. The silos would also house multi-purpose areas, offices, restaurants and such other commercial spaces.

According to the plan put forward by NL Architects, in the fashion of the Denmark Water Tower Renovation, the roofs of two towers of Amsterdam’s silos could be extended up to 18 meters – the maximum height the towers could support.

Inside tower A would be a 40-metre-high climbing atrium that appears like an inverted funnel with various cantilevers, wall-facets, and overhangs— all posing a challenge to climbers.

Tower B would house a rooftop restaurant, office space, a salon, music studio, and a cinema.

Both the towers would be linked by a footbridge at the original rooftop height of the silos.

However, despite all the features and advantages proposed by NL Architects, the Amsterdam City Council turned down its design. Instead, the Council chose a project submitted by Arons en Gelauff, which would be called the Annie MG Schmidt House.

The Annie MG Schmidt House — also a multi-purpose cultural centre — is said to be a little more “family-oriented” with a playground, more restaurants and shops. It is expected to be opened in 2011.

[via DesignBoom]