Scientists Find Icy Body Orbiting The Sun Outside The Solar System

March 30, 2014 / No Comments

The BBC reported on March 28, 2014, that scientists have now discovered a planet in our Solar System, which is for now being called 2012 VP113. The new planet is far in the galaxy and has an icy composition and the second object to be found outside the major orbiting planets.

Scientists Find Icy Body Orbiting The Sun Outside The Solar System Scientists Find Icy Body Orbiting The Sun Outside The Solar System

The last object that was found was called Sedna in the inner Oort Cloud, which is the name for the space beyond the major objects.

According to researchers, more objects are out there, and it’s a matter of time before they are discovered.

Scott Sheppard, who is a part of Carnegie Institution of Science in Washington DC, said the recent findings have been done through a powerful camera that’s placed on a four-meter telescope in Chile.

The new planet, according to Sheppard, is very cold and has ice would be more solid than rock here on earth. He also mentioned in his byte to BBC News that there are more to be found, many of which may be larger than Mars, Earth and Pluto, but since they are on distant orbits, detection is tough.

According to the findings by Sheppard and Chad Trujillo, his colleague from Gemini Observatory in Hawaii, the new found 2012 VP113 takes around 4,000 years to revolve the Sun.

Over the years, studies have been done in the Kuiper Belt, which refers to the region beyond Neptune, but the Oort Cloud is even far away, which makes it difficult to study.

If the models of Solar System formation are to be checked, it is suggestive that 2012 VP113 might not be created, where it is spotted today. Either it was pulled out gravitationally out of the Kuiper Belt, expelling it from the solar system, either by a planet or star.

More facts are awaited.