Major Tropical Storms Steadily Moving From the Equator To the Poles

May 17, 2014 / No Comments

The areas that have been traditionally identified as “tropical storm prone regions” are quickly changing according to the latest study by University of Wisconsin-Madison.

A team led by Jim Kossin, a NOAA National Climatic Data Center scientist, states that tropical storms are indeed shifting away from the equator and towards the poles at a rate of 33 to 39 miles per decade.

Tropical Stormes to cause greater havoc in years to come Major Tropical Storms Steadily Moving From the Equator To the Poles

This latest finding was based on the origin and path of tropical storms in both the hemispheres across the last three decades.

The data conclusively proves that while majority of the storm activity still is centered around the tropics, this belt is expanding fast towards the poles.

According to Kossin, the new finding suggests that the regions close the equator are increasingly less prone to tropical storms while those in the temperate zones now have a new threat!

The studies show an urgent necessity in re-identifying potential areas that could fall prey to major storms and reassessment of the potential flood and landslide risks.

Growing danger of Tropical Storms Climate Change Major Tropical Storms Steadily Moving From the Equator To the Poles

Factors like climate change and global warming have led to the expansion of warmer regions on the planet and hence tropical storms also seem to be moving outwards, away from earth’s equatorial belt.

While storms originating at the equator are gaining intensity by the day, new densely populated cities are coming under threat thanks to this increasing storm belt.

The current hope is that if carbon emissions are significantly cut down, then this expansion of the tropics might also subside before there is permanent damage.