Geology

Microbes, Not Volcanoes, Caused Earth’s Largest Mass Extinction!

April 2, 2014 / No Comments

Seems like big things do indeed come in small packages! For decades now scientists were more or less convinced that the great mass extinction that occurred towards the end of the Permian period was caused most likely by volcanic activity. But a team led by MIT geophysics professor Daniel Rothman has finally found conclusive evidence thanks to sediments in China that point ...

Saving the Lascaux Cave From Fungus Attack

February 27, 2009 / No Comments

A UNESCO World Heritage Site famous across the globe for their 15,000 to 17,500 years old cave paintings, the Lascaux caves in Southern France are now under a serious threat. A fungus attack which is spreading in the form of dark stains, is threatening the amazing prehistoric murals of bulls, felines and other images. The problem of fungus infection is nothing ...

Aral Sea Has Partially Healed

August 25, 2008 / No Comments

For the last few decades, the Aral Sea in Central Asia suffered of what the Russians did, back in the 50s. They diverted the two tributary rivers into irrigation for cotton and rice crops and caused what scientists called an irreversible environmental disaster. Aral Sea Nowdays (Google Maps) The smaller bodies of water became much saltier destroying the fishing industry ...

When Creation Fights Back

August 15, 2008 / No Comments

I don't particularly like the word 'nature.' I prefer the word creation. It's all about my convictions. But, that's not the point of this post. The point is when things get out of whack on our home planet, they can really get out of kilter. And, there is not a whole lot we can do about it. A flood in southern ...

Mars – A Home Far Away from Home

July 17, 2008 / No Comments

Planetary geologists are guessing that valleys on Mars came from gushes of water resulting from past rainfall or groundwater springs. Theorize, believe, speculate ... they all have the same meaning when it comes right down to it. Scientists so much want to believe that life, as we know it, existed elsewhere that they will jump to any conclusion. And jump they ...

What’s good about high gas prices? Japan – China Love

June 20, 2008 / 1 Comment

What good about high gas prices? I can think of a lot of things, but here's one. Japan and China, historical enemies, are cooperating in the East China Sea as they explore for more natural gas. It's the first time the two countries have agreed to explore undersea resources together. The exploration is overtly an attempt at improving the relations ...

Mitsubishi Wins Order for Five Geothermal Plants in Iceland

June 14, 2008 / 1 Comment

I love it when a plan comes together. I love it more when countries work together to make the world a better place. In this case, Japan's Mitsubishi Heavy Industries will be working together with the Iceland Power Company, Reykjavik Energy, to build five 45-megawatt geothermal power plants in the small country to the north of the European continent. The new ...

The Andes Mountains to Double Their Height in 4 Million Years

June 6, 2008 / 2 Comments

Did you know that mountains grow at a relatively fast rate (a few mm each year) until the forces that form them are no longer active? Apparently that's the case with the Andes Mountains which are one of the longest and highest mountain ranges in the world. For millions of years the Andes grew slowly. Then all of a sudden, 10 ...